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PORTUS Port-City Relationship and Urban Waterfront Redevelopment

LAST UPDATE, September 19, 2018
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PORTUSplus 7  |  Best Papers

 

 

History of port cities

 

The aim of this section is to publish articles and research work that focus on studying, giving consideration to and analysing the historical development of ports and port cities from the outset, i.e. from the time they first became urban port settlements in prehistoric times, until midway through the 20th Century. The articles may offer either an insight into port cities in specific eras or periods, or partial aspects of the relationships between ports and their cities; these could be from an urban planning, socioeconomic, environmental or cultural viewpoint, etc.

 

      

PAGES SANCHEZ José Manuel

 

Evolution of Lisbon’s Port-City relation: from the earthquake of 1755 to the port plan of 1887

 

ABSTRACT

 

The industrial revolution has been considered by many historians, geographers and planners a key moment in the evolution of the port-city relation. This period is often seen as the first break up between the port and the city due to the technological changes, the jump in the maritime and industrial scale, and the first large industrial port plans. We will explain how this period occurred in Lisbon, what other issues might have affected the relation between the port, the city and the river, and what alternatives were discussed at the time. In the end we will be able to understand how a decision related with the port development might affect the image of the port-city for centuries. Finally we invite the reader to join us in an imagination exercise to picture an alternative port-city relation in Lisbon today.

 

KEYWORDS

 

Lisbon; Waterfront; Port City; Industrial Revolution; Port Planning; 19th Century; Urban History; Port History

 

PAGES SANCHEZ José Manuel

Architect, Hafencity University

 

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Future scenarios: planning and prospects

 

Different categories of articles are featured in this section. For example:
- Port planning and urban-port planning carried out on different levels and in a variety of areas.
- Work that is of a methodological and epistemological nature concerning urban and port planning, on the techniques and tools that are used for planning, whether they are of an integrated nature (strategic plans) or whether they concern urban planning, infrastructures or are of an economic kind.
- Articles whose purpose is to analyse and reflect upon the port city of the future and the future of port cities, the challenges and opportunities that ports and cities will be facing in the short- and medium-term, or studies that prepare concepts, new visions and proposals.

 

 

MONDOU Véronique, TAUNAY Benjamin, SHIWEI Shen

 

The cruise ports of call in China: a new form of harbour development

 

ABSTRACT

 

The port activity in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has been enriched over the last ten years thanks to the development of maritime cruising. This article focuses on the creation of ports for this new activity. The text stresses the role of the various actors – the central State, the provinces and international cruise lines – with sometimes divergent interests, before arguing that, more generally, cruising is not limited to economic activity but also a political dimension.

 

KEYWORDS

Planning; Cruise ports of call; China

 

 

MONDOU Véronique

UFR ESTHUA Tourisme et Culture, Laboratoire ESO, Université d’Angers, France

 

 

TAUNAY Benjamin

UFR ESTHUA Tourisme et Culture, Laboratoire ESO, Université d’Angers, France

 

 

SHIWEI Shen

Université de Ningbo, Institut franco-chinois du tourisme et de la culture, Chine

 

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Urban-port development and environmental sustainability

 

One of the areas where the problems that exist in the relationships between ports and their urban environments have become most apparent in recent years, is the question of environmental sustainability. The aim of this section is to publish articles that:
- Examine the environmental problems created by port activities and their effects upon both the natural and the urban environments, contextualising general and specific problems alike.
- Concepts, tools of a technological type, regulations, procedures and controls for the environmental management of ports are all presented.
- First-hand accounts, experiences and examples are given of port-city sustainability, environmental conservancy and improving the quality of urban life.
- A description is given of innovations and new ideas for achieving environmental sustainability or concerning climate change.

 

CLARK Nancy M.

 

Rising Waters and Coastal Port Cities: The Case of Miami

 

ABSTRACT

 

Port cities around the globe are vulnerable to the impact of climate change. Adaptation is essential to maintain the economic viability of the world’s major ports and to protect their large populations and assets. The port city of Miami highlights the extreme impact that sea level rise can have on these economic engines. Ranked second in the world for economic exposure, Miami stands to lose hundreds of billions in assets over the next century. CHU is providing leadership in research on urban adaptation for Miami as well as other coastal cities around the world through collaborative programs, workshops and project-based research. Our recent proposals for Miami explore adaptation at a city-scale by rethinking infrastructural systems such as water management, energy, and mobility; by introducing residential typologies that embrace new water conditions with minimum displacement; and creating real estate investment opportunities while providing enhanced water-based transport.

 

KEYWORDS

Resiliency; Miami; Urban Redevelopment; Adaptation; Port Cities

 

CLARK Nancy M.

Director, Center for Hydro-generated Urbanism at the University of Florida, 256 Architecture Building POB 115702, 32611 Gainesville, Florida, USA

 

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Culture and identity

 

A thematic area that is devoted to publishing articles and work on questions such as:
- Port city cultural heritage: nautical and port heritage (material and immaterial); conservation; reappraisal and enrichment.
- The collective cultural memory of port cities through such facilities as libraries, maritime and port museums, archives.
- Ports as a cultural reference: ports and written culture (language and communication, literature, the press); ports and audiovisual culture (music, cinema, photography); ports and the arts (illustrations, paintings, prints, sculpture); ports and the necessities of life (diet, culinary activities, food and drink), clothing (attire, fashion, uniforms), etc.
- Ports and urban identity: the distinctive features of ports (port-city symbols and symbolism, metaphors and ports, the notion of port cities); the port city idea (perception and meaning, port city emotions, etc.)

 

 

VIMAWALA Bhavna

 

Cities & Waterfront. Indian & Western perception: Similarity, Dissimilarity or Diversity

 

ABSTRACT

Urban waterfront rejuvenation is being taken up throughout the world but is mostly confined to developed countries. However, it is now impacting developing countries to revive historic cities, tourism, leisure and economic development under the influence of globalization. The phenomenon of the waterfront is quite diverse in the Indian context. Water and religion are inextricably woven in the pattern of Indian life. The rivers, sea or lakes have significance and are regarded as holy. Worshiping water and water body is continues to be the part of the daily custom. The accessibility to water is the main features which lead to the particular response of the water edge reflected in the structure of the cities. Waterfront, an area of recreation, has less significance compare to utilitarian and religious aspects. In the last few decades in India, there is a rapid urban development and most of them have turned their waterfronts into dump yard, illegal encroachment and the growth of the city has no relation with its waterfronts. Waterfront development has been undertaken increasingly now in India. But Indian cities have really shown less concern about the existence of waterfront except for very few recent examples in India. Three stages have been derived, for the waterfront transformation based on western perception to comprehend the concept in a more holistic manner. The structure of the Indian cities and morphological model describes the morphological periods of evolution of cities discusses the importance to understand the similarity, dissimilarity, and diversity which exist between Indian and Western context.

 

KEYWORDS

City Structure; Waterfront; Transformation; Morphology; Indian; Western; Diversity.

 

VIMAWALA Bhavna

Professor, Faculty of Architecture, SCET, Surat Athwalines 395001 Surat, Gujarat, India

 

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